MY GRANNY’S ALBUM: 1

My maternal grandmother, Edith Claire Myrtle Donald (née King), was fourteen years old when her older brother, Frank, gave her an album for her birthday on 8th May 1903. Most of the entries are dated between 1903 and 1905, although there is at least one dated 1919 and the most recent was one my mother added in 1934, when she was fifteen.

It is akin to some of the ‘autograph books’ that were popular during the 1950s and 1960s, in which people wrote verses or drew pictures. What is striking about this collection is the trouble my Granny’s friends and family went to when making their contributions. I will be sharing some of these from time to time as a reminder of the times of yore, when the pace may have been a little less frenetic.

Look at the intricate details of the cats, birds, dog, rabbit and spider on this page of ‘autographs’. Many are undated, while some are dated between 1906 and 1910.

The violets painted at the corners of this verse quoted from Keats are as fresh today as they were over a hundred years ago.

The ink has faded on this page, although the sentiments expressed have not. My Granny had a ‘contented mind’ and enjoyed a variety of friends who loved her dearly. Those ones still alive did ‘cleave to thee / whatever may betide’. As young children, we were in awe of the way the (to us) old people visiting my Granny and Grandpa at their retirement home in Southbroom on the south coast of what is now KwaZulu-Natal seemed to care for each other’s welfare.

I will leave you this time with a lovely painting of Coleskop – near Colesberg – along with a description of “The Myrtle”

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4 thoughts on “MY GRANNY’S ALBUM: 1

  1. They look to be ‘calling cards’ from her artistic bookish friends. I like Ruthven’s: One may smile and smile and be a villain. From Hamlet. Reminds me of some people I know! Yes. It does remind me too of Isak Dinesen’s Out of Africa and reading being a form of sustenance in those wide open spaces and scarcity of people, and the storytelling as entertainment. Lovely post.

    • I think the “scarcity of people” as you put it and the lack of other forms of ‘home entertainment’ that we can enjoy today probably meant more time was devoted to reading – a lot of the contributers quote poetry – and to nurturing one’s relationships with family and friends.

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