ANOTHER BEAUTIFUL TREE

This one grows on the pavement outside our garden, so we have been able to enjoy the beautiful purple-mauve blossoms of the Jacaranda – a colour that is very difficult to capture accurately on film.

Jacarandas were brought to South Africa from Argentina in about 1880 for ornamental purposes – particularly for public spaces, such as streets. Those planted along our street look their best when they are in full bloom at this time of the year and carpet the ground underneath them with their lovely blossoms.

Here is a better view of them – the ones on the left-hand side of the street are Brazilian Pepper trees.

The carpet of flowers look very pretty early in the morning, before vehicles have driven over and squished them.

Jacarandas have been planted as street trees in town too. The dark shapes you can see in these trees are seed pods that have already formed.

 

26 thoughts on “ANOTHER BEAUTIFUL TREE

    • I am not aware of a particular fragrance of the flowers on the trees – once on the ground, they take on a musty smell as they rot; this is not unpleasant.

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    • They are very beautiful indeed, both singly and en masse. Somehow though their true colouring does not come through in photographs – even digital ones – so would like them even more ‘in the flesh’ as it were.

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  1. They certainly are a sight to behold, both adorning the tree and the ground beneath them. As children, we used to “wear” the individual flowers on our fingers, dancing around pretending to be fairies.

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  2. What a beautiful sight, the row of them along the street. I have only ever seen one in my whole town, and of course I only notice it at whatever time it blooms, IF I happen to be driving that way! It always makes me happy!

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  3. They are lovely in flower although I still associate them with writing exams! The street jacaranda trees in Pmb appear to be reaching the end of their life spans, and after big storms there are generally several trees that topple over uprooted by the wind and/or the weight of the wet wood.

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    • In Pietermaritzburg jacaranda flowers were an integral part of exam preparation and writing! They flower too late for that in Grahamstown I think for the students have mostly gone home by the time the flowers are out. Perhaps climate change has something to do with it?

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