LOOKING AT RED HARTEBEEST

We are used to seeing Red Hartebeest (Alcelaphus buselaphus caama) in the Addo Elephant National Park, where they often occur in the company of zebras. Although I have featured these animals before, it is worth taking another look at them. Their smooth glossy coats shine beautifully in the sunlight, often highlighting their characteristically pale rumps. Dark patches from the front of their shoulders extend down the front of their forelegs, looking a bit like shadows.

The colouration of the Red Hartebeest varies, but all have a darker colour that extends from the shoulders to the mid-back.

Their foreheads tend to be dark with a wide patch of brown between the eyes.

Red Hartebeest are predominantly grazers that do not require ready access to water, as long as there is sufficient moisture in their food.

While they are by nature social animals that occur in herds, I have noticed single ones on some of the farms I pass while driving in the countryside. These individuals (perhaps the farmers only have one!) are nearly always spotted on the edge of open grasslands.

When females give birth, they isolate themselves and hide their calves in the scrub for about two weeks before they join the herd.

18 thoughts on “LOOKING AT RED HARTEBEEST

  1. The picture with the beast lying down looking straight into the camera shows how different they look. Love those ears.

    Like

    • Thank you very much, Belinda. All bar one of these photographs were taken in the Addo Elephant National Park. The other was on a game farm nearby. They have not been domesticated.

      Liked by 1 person

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