CAPE BUNTING

The Cape Bunting (Emberiza capensis) is one of the delightful birds that occurs over much of South Africa, where they can be seen in rocky areas as well as in grassland and along dry watercourses.

Even though the boldly striped head and bright chestnut wings immediately draws attention, their colouring helps them to easily blend into their environment.

Their chestnut wing coverts contrast beautifully with their greyish nape and mantle.

These sparrow-like birds hop on the ground in search of seeds, although they also catch insects and feed on fruit and flower buds.

Cape Buntings are not the easiest birds to photograph as they seldom remain still enough. These ones were seen around the rest camp in the Mountain Zebra National Park, where they have possibly become habituated to human company – and so are a delight to observe.

 

27 thoughts on “CAPE BUNTING

  1. He is so good-looking! Easy to love…

    I’m continually blessed by your camera work and your constancy in sharing small beauties and points of interest from your world. As the years pass, the images and stories pertaining to South Africa which accumulate in my mind create quite a presence!

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    • Thank you for providing this link: the Emberiza family have strong characteristics that groups them together! We have a few species and they all look lovely – as does yours!

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  2. The Rest Camp at Mountain Zebra NP really is such a treat for anyone hoping to find otherwise hard-to-photograph birds from that part of the country. Your shots are marvelous, Anne.

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  3. They are lovely little birds and it must have been a pleasure seeing them so tame. (I recall when I was a kid the black and white on their heads reminded me of the old-fashioned bull’s eye sweets.)

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