BIRDS EATING FLOWERS

I have often noticed the tubular flowers of the Cape honeysuckle lying on the ground as if something had deliberately cut them off – well, that ‘something’ has generally proved to be one or other of the weavers that frequent our garden! Keen to get to the store of nectar at the base – and having beaks far too short to reach inside – the weavers simply nip off the base of the flowers for their prize snack.

During July and into early August, I have observed the stalks of the Aloe ferox growing outside our lounge have increasingly been stripped too. This time I caught a pair of Streakyheaded Seedeaters in the act. Apart from probing the base of the flowers to get to the nectar, they also eat the buds, anthers and stamens – this picture was taken through the window:

Other birds enjoying the rich source of nectar from aloes – only they have the long curved beaks to poke into the flowers – are the Green Woodhoopoes that chuckle and cackle their way through our garden every now and then:

The tall Erythrina caffra tree in the back garden hosts a wide variety of birds throughout its fairly long flowering season. Cape Weavers appear to be very partial to nectar and are considered to be among the more important pollinators of aloes. This one is snacking on one of the Erythrina caffra flowers:

A Blackheaded Oriole takes a turn to feast on the flowers too:

 

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18 thoughts on “BIRDS EATING FLOWERS

  1. Hopefully, there are enough left over to pollinate and set seed. Our Baltimore orioles will nip flowers in the spring, I’ve noticed, but most birds here don’t seem to like flowers, with the exception of hummingbirds that are avid nectar fans.

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    • Well observed, Belinda. They do appear to be attracted to mostly orange and red flowers. I will keep a close watch on the pink Cape chestnut flowers once they are in full bloom. I wonder if this is because our indigenous autumn / winter flowers tend to be in these warm colours.

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